reawaken

[ uh-wey-kuh n ]SEE DEFINITION OF reawaken
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR REAWAKEN

The only thing that keeps me sane is the hope that we may reawaken them.

In vain did Gustave try to reawaken the ardor of his partisans.

Her father had vanished and there was even yet nothing in that to reawaken the pang of loss.

The world, her own social world, seemed all at once to reawaken before her.

Then came new experiences to reawaken the slumbering vision.

Of what use is the sun if not to reawaken that dark sleeper—the conscience?

Hadrian asked me to help him reawaken in Athens Apollo and his Muses.

If I might be with you long enough, if I might reawaken the old tenderness!

Is it time to reawaken this industrial giant, to get government back within its means, and to lighten our punitive tax burden.

The storm in the heavens will pass by, but the tempest caused by a raging mob will reawaken with double fury.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English awæcnan (intransitive), "to spring into being, arise, originate," also, less often, "to wake up;" earlier onwæcnan, from a- (1) "on" + wæcnan (see waken). Transitive meaning "to rouse from sleep" is recorded from 1510s; figurative sense of "to stir up, rouse to activity" is from c.1600.

Originally strong declension (past tense awoc, past participle awacen), already in Old English it was confused with awake (v.) and a weak past tense awæcnede (modern awakened) emerged and has since become the accepted form, with awoke and awoken transferred to awake. Subtle shades of distinction determine the use of awake or awaken in modern English. Related: Awakening.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR REAWAKEN

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.