Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PIE

Remove from the fire and pour into the baked crust of a pie.

The most popular form in which it is served is probably in pie.

"Four hundred and twenty might be baked in that pie," she laughed.

She turned her back and slowly slid into the oven the pie she was carrying.

I was angry with the girl for putting her finger into our pie.

Cover the pie with a crust, notch and ornament it, and bake it well.

When done put the pie on a large dish, and pour the gravy over it.

Bake the pie in a moderate oven, about three quarters of an hour.

At this point, he took up a knife, and cut a careful triangle of pie.

Then said the lovely bride, ‘Dear Captain Murderer, what pie is this to be?’

WORD ORIGIN

"pastry," mid-14c. (probably older; piehus "bakery" is attested from late 12c.), from Medieval Latin pie "meat or fish enclosed in pastry" (c.1300), perhaps related to Medieval Latin pia "pie, pastry," also possibly connected with pica "magpie" (see pie (n.2)) on notion of the bird's habit of collecting miscellaneous objects. Figurative of "something to be shared out" by 1967.

According to OED, not known outside English, except Gaelic pighe, which is from English. In the Middle Ages, a pie had many ingredients, a pastry but one. Fruit pies began to appear c.1600. Figurative sense of "something easy" is from 1889. Pie-eyed "drunk" is from 1904. Phrase pie in the sky is 1911, from Joe Hill's Wobbly parody of hymns. Pieman is not attested earlier than the nursery rhyme "Simple Simon" (c.1820). Pie chart is from 1922.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PIE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.