confection

[ kuh n-fek-shuh n ]SEE DEFINITION OF confection

Synonyms for confection

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CONFECTION

It is used partly as a confection, but in the main as a sirup.

I then inquired, on a day when I had detected her with a bag of the confection.

There was a black gown and a grey gown and a confection in pale blue.

There are also other ingredients, which are used in this Confection.

Any fruit may be made into a confection which, in India, is called "cheese."

And, as for the Pictures of Claye, their confection is after this maner.

We also made an excursion, going in a boat and there eating a confection.

The quantity of the confection may be advantageously doubled.

This confection was found of great value on the march as a substitute for water.

Both from the sanitary and the mental standpoint this confection was unwholesome.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-14c., confescioun, from Old French confeccion (12c., Modern French confection) "drawing up (of a treaty, etc.); article, product," in pharmacology, "mixture, compound," from Late Latin confectionem (nominative confectio) "a confection," in classical Latin, "a making, preparing," noun of action from confect-, past participle stem of conficere "to prepare," from com- "with" (see com-) + facere "to make, do" (see factitious). Originally "the making by means of ingredients," sense of "candy or light pastry" predominated from 16c.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CONFECTION

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nounbaked good
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.