Synonyms for mooning

MOST RELEVANT

Antonyms for mooning

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MOONING

Thus musing and "mooning," he lay down, dressed as he was, and fell asleep.

Thus dreaming and "mooning," he reached the "Fisherman's Home."

"I thought I should find you mooning down here, Peter," said she, sharply.

You must think me very foolish to be mooning about like this.

And Rosemary will be mooning around and not catch them until it is too late.

In mercy to me tell me what you mean, and don't stand there mooning away like that.

If you are mooning about that worthless boy of yours, you had better get over it.

And there go Tom and Ruth mooning off together with fish lines.

You are such a beggar for getting off by yourself and mooning.

"Milly's not mooning; she's making notes, like you," Ian replied, for his wife.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English mona, from Proto-Germanic *menon- (cf. Old Saxon and Old High German mano, Old Frisian mona, Old Norse mani, Danish maane, Dutch maan, German Mond, Gothic mena "moon"), from PIE *me(n)ses- "moon, month" (cf. Sanskrit masah "moon, month;" Avestan ma, Persian mah, Armenian mis "month;" Greek mene "moon," men "month;" Latin mensis "month;" Old Church Slavonic meseci, Lithuanian menesis "moon, month;" Old Irish mi, Welsh mis, Breton miz "month"), probably from root *me- "to measure," in reference to the moon's phases as the measure of time.

A masculine noun in Old English. In Greek, Italic, Celtic, Armenian the cognate words now mean only "month." Greek selene (Lesbian selanna) is from selas "light, brightness (of heavenly bodies)." Old Norse also had tungl "moon," ("replacing mani in prose" - Buck), evidently an older Germanic word for "heavenly body," cognate with Gothic tuggl, Old English tungol "heavenly body, constellation," of unknown origin or connection. Hence Old Norse tunglfylling "lunation," tunglœrr "lunatic" (adj.).

Extended 1665 to satellites of other planets. To shoot the moon "leave without paying rent" is British slang from c.1823; card-playing sense perhaps influenced by gambler's shoot the works (1922) "go for broke" in shooting dice. The moon race and the U.S. space program of the 1960s inspired a number of coinages, including, from those skeptical of the benefits to be gained, moondoggle (cf. boondoggle). The man in the moon is mentioned since early 14c.; he carries a bundle of thorn-twigs and is accompanied by a dog. Some Japanese, however, see a rice-cake-making rabbit in the moon.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MOONING

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.