Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR JARGON

He knew the jargon of Liberty, the tune that set the patriots a-dancing.

"Thieves' jargon--manufactured evidence," Lyttleton explained.

His rambling, delirious utterances were a jargon of mixed tongues.

The question which I cannot solve is, On which of the Celtic languages is this jargon based?

“Peut-être,” said she in her French jargon, vanishing into her chamber.

Need I add that tum-tum in the Chinook jargon signifies the soul!

I'd give a good deal to understand their jargon,' replied Ben.

From the jargon, therefore, of the Highland gillies, I pass to the character of their Chief.

His Chinook jargon was published by the Smithsonian Institution.

There was a jargon of argument in their strange guttural language.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-14c., "unintelligible talk, gibberish; chattering, jabbering," from Old French jargon "a chattering" (of birds), also "language, speech," especially "idle talk; thieves' Latin." Ultimately of echoic origin (cf. Latin garrire "to chatter," English gargle). Often applied to something the speaker does not understand, hence meaning "mode of speech full of unfamiliar terms" (1650s). Middle English also had it as a verb, jargounen "to chatter" (late 14c.), from French.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR JARGON

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.