euphoria

[ yoo-fawr-ee-uh, -fohr- ]SEE DEFINITION OF euphoria
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR EUPHORIA

When he had awakened, it had been with the euphoria all gone and with his present hangover.

Metchnikoff speaks somewhere of an instinct toward death and the euphoria which accompanies its realization.

It seems to be one form of the random activity that goes with euphoria.

The baby seems to smile, at first, just from good spirits (euphoria).

Alcohol has a very definite tendency to produce a state of euphoria, that is, of well-being.

Everyone roughly within a radius of fifty feet—I've checked the limit a thousand times—immediately feels a sort of euphoria.

By some of the earlier botanical works the litchi is placed either in the genus Dimocarpus or Euphoria.

There is no metaphysical hair-splitting in An Enemy of the People, nor sentimental talk about euphoria and going happily to death.

Of these, remains of Lachnosterna were found in 27 stomachs and of Allorhina and Euphoria in one each.

It was against the law for dozy-pills to produce a sensation of euphoria, of well-being.

WORD ORIGIN

1727, a physician's term for "condition of feeling healthy and comfortable (especially when sick)," medical Latin, from Greek euphoria "power of enduring easily," from euphoros, literally "bearing well," from eu "well" (see eu-) + pherein "to carry" (see infer). Non-technical use, now the main one, dates to 1882 and is perhaps a reintroduction.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR EUPHORIA

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.