emulative

[ verb em-yuh-leyt; adjective em-yuh-lit ]SEE DEFINITION OF emulative

Synonyms for emulative

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR EMULATIVE

Their eagerness was emulative, and made them rapid in their haste.

She was too self-centred, and, if the truth were told, too emulative.

Wealth gives rank, and gratifies not only the greed but also the emulative spirit of the pack.

Pecuniary management is of an emulative character and gives, primarily, relative success only.

By degrees men and women are making ready to take their places in an emulative rather than a materialistically competitive order.

Goethe grasped antiquity in the right way · invariably with an emulative soul.

It will be an emulative pleasure to children, a new delight to parents, a mutual gratification to be at school together in church.

His emulative practice of his art asks for a closer consideration than that usually given to it.

The result is that the instinct of workmanship works out in an emulative demonstration of force.

To read of a noble deed brought swift tears to her eyes in these days of mutation, and stirred her to emulative dreams.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR EMULATIVE

apish

adjectiveaffected
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.