Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DEXTERITY

Cellini was remarkable for his readiness and dexterity in handicraft.

Three or four times he lunged with incomparable dash and dexterity.

It was a wonderful exhibition of strength, patience, and dexterity.

He marveled at the dexterity with which she lifted him against her slim shoulder.

To a dexterity so fatal he added a judgment that had not failed when confronted with deceit.

Another professor had the dexterity to manage in a different way.

Their skill and dexterity in the use of the axe in hunting is extraordinary.

This piece of dexterity is the only one with which they are acquainted.

He at once diverted the current of his narrative with the dexterity the occasion demanded.

But mentality and spirit cannot be bought—only labour and dexterity.

WORD ORIGIN

1520s, from Middle French dexterité (16c.), from Latin dexteritatem (nominative dexteritas) "readiness, skillfulness, prosperity," from dexter "skillful," also "right (hand)" (source of Old French destre, Spanish diestro, etc.), from PIE root *deks- "on the right hand," hence "south" to one facing east (cf. Sanskrit daksinah "on the right hand, southern, skillful;" Avestan dashina- "on the right hand;" Greek dexios "on the right hand," also "fortunate, clever;" Old Irish dess "on the right hand, southern;" Welsh deheu; Gaulish Dexsiva, name of a goddess of fortune; Gothic taihswa; Lithuanian desinas; Old Church Slavonic desnu, Russian desnoj). The Latin form is with the comparative suffix -ter, thus meaning etymologically "the better direction." Middle English dester meant "right hand," and in heraldry dexter means "on the right side."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR DEXTERITY

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.