decadent

[ dek-uh-duhnt, dih-keyd-nt ]SEE DEFINITION OF decadent
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DECADENT

Above all things he despised Greek art; it was, he said decadent.

The exquisiteness of the decadent efflorescence of a passing race.

The Nejd was the one clean spot in the decadent Moslem world.

So, we may be sure, the decadent artists of the Graeco-Roman world were not rebels.

All our East has suffered from the decadent touch of Europe.

Such a cynical and decadent philosophy could not go unchallenged.

I am a German, and I hate these decadent peoples we call Belgians.

There is no real taste among us for the erotic or the decadent.

The one Albanian that I was ever on speaking terms with was rather a decadent example.

Laughter that is decadent is not good for these thousand generations.

WORD ORIGIN

"in a state of decline or decay (from a former condition of excellence)," 1837, from French décadent, back-formation from décadence (see decadence). In reference to literary (later, other artistic) schools that believed, or affected to believe, they lived in an age of artistic decadence, 1885 in French, 1888 in English. Usually in a bad sense, e.g.:

Beckoning sense of "desirable and satisfying to self-indulgence" begins c.1970 in commercial publications in reference to desserts.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR DECADENT

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.