Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CARVE

As for me, I ask no help from any one: I go into the world and will carve out my own way.

A sculptor was set to work to carve a new one from the ruin.

But, mon brave,” said he, “you would find this one a tough swine to carve!

Ambitious, light-hearted, he went to Africa to carve out a name in the army.

Alden sat down at the table and began to carve a roasted chicken.

The general's orders to me were to put you under arrest, not to carve you into small pieces.

But how was I to carve a friend out of this black Bristol at such short notice?

It shall be the last pipe I will ever carve, and I will remember you whilst I carve it.'

He seemed to have been trying to carve his name; for a large E and half of an N were there.

Just in front of him a butler started to carve a duck with a long, sharp knife.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English ceorfan (class III strong verb; past tense cearf, past participle corfen) "to cut, cut down, slay; to carve, cut out, engrave," from West Germanic *kerfan (cf. Old Frisian kerva, Middle Dutch and Dutch kerven, German kerben "to cut, notch"), from PIE root *gerbh- "to scratch," making carve the English cognate of Greek graphein "to write," originally "to scratch" on clay tablets with a stylus.

Once extensively used, most senses now usurped by cut (v.). Meaning specialized to sculpture, meat, etc., by 16c. Related: Carved; carving. Original strong conjugation has been abandoned, but archaic carven lingers.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CARVE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.