Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BRAVING

He had a confounded assurance, the devil's own cheek, familiar with danger, and braving it.

Perhaps you think that I am braving you in what I am saying now, as in what I said before about the tears and prayers.

His faithful Duke was with him, braving a temperature of -32°.

He needs me, he loves me, he is braving the wrath of the world and of heaven for my sake.

What object can he possibly have in braving three times his force in a gale like this?

“Well, what will you do,” Evelyn challenged, with an heroic air of braving the worst.

"Certainly not," said Mr. Chalk, braving her, although his voice trembled.

It was, she considered, an occasion for braving the doctor's interdict.

Many an old timer had told him of braving them upon sea and land.

But a few years back it was braving death to attempt to remove them.

WORD ORIGIN

late 15c., from Middle French brave, "splendid, valiant," from Italian bravo "brave, bold," originally "wild, savage," possibly from Medieval Latin bravus "cutthroat, villain," from Latin pravus "crooked, depraved;" a less likely etymology being from Latin barbarus (see barbarous). A Celtic origin (Irish breagh, Cornish bray) also has been suggested.

Old English words for this, some with overtones of "rashness," included modig (now "moody"), beald ("bold"), cene ("keen"), dyrstig ("daring"). Brave new world is from the title of Aldous Huxley's 1932 satirical utopian novel; he lifted the phrase from Shakespeare ("Tempest" v.i.183).

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.