Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BOASTED

This boasted power of intellect—this giddy triumph of beauty—what do they do for you?

She had boasted to him once of having learned to smoke at school.

We have known and boasted all along that they were the principles of a liberated mankind.

I have boasted that I was once in love before:—and indeed I thought I was.

"He's afraid of me," boasted Reddy in a purposely loud tone.

Then comes the "something desperate" in him that Hamlet boasted of—and the end.

While Alberich boasted, he was planning how he might trick the dwarf and take his gold.

It boasted of several contributors and a list of regular subscribers.

I send you the boasted confutation-letter, just now put into my hands.

Napoleon's soldiers themselves could not have boasted of more experience than they.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-13c., "arrogance, presumption, pride, vanity;" c.1300, "a brag, boastful speech," from Anglo-French bost "ostentation," probably via Scandinavian (cf. Norwegian baus "proud, bold, daring"), from Proto-Germanic *bausia "to blow up, puff up, swell" (cf. Middle High German bus "swelling," dialectal German baustern "to swell;" Middle Dutch bose, Dutch boos "evil, wicked, angry," Old High German bosi "worthless, slanderous," German böse "evil, bad, angry"), from PIE *bhou-, variant of root *beu-, *bheu- "to grow, swell" (see bull (n.2)).

The notion apparently is of being "puffed up" with pride; cf. Old English belgan "to become angry, offend, provoke," belg "anger, arrogance," from the same root as bellows and belly (n.). Related: Boasted; boasting. An Old English word for "boasting" was micelsprecende, "big talk."

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.