Grammar

  1. How To Use Commas In Greetings And Closings

    Oh, the comma, that little punctuation mark that packs a potent punch. It has the power to thoroughly transform the meaning of sentences and can single-handedly send grammarians into fits of rage. We won’t even get into the damage that one’s feelings about the Oxford comma can do to a relationship.  One area in which the comma often gets overlooked, however, is greetings and sign-offs. …

  2. Test Your Grammar Skills With Our Grammar Gameshow: Episode 2

    Hello grammar geeks. We're back with Round 2 of the Gigantic, Gratifying, Grammar Gameshow.
  3. What Are Participles And How Do You Use Them?

    Participles. They’re verbs, they’re adjectives, they’re perfect and progressive! Is there anything they can’t do? If you’re wondering what a participle does, you’re not alone. These mighty verbs take many forms and can be tricky to master. Let’s explore the different types. What is a participle? To start, participles are words derived from verbs that can function as adjectives or as parts of verb phrases …

  4. Test Your Grammar Skills With Our Grammar Gameshow: Episode 1

    YES, grammar can be fun ... keep watching ... because we've asked these 2 people to join our first ever Gigantic, Gratifying, Grammar Gameshow.
  5. Why Is “Ain’t” Such A Controversial Word?

    What’s all the fuss over ain’t about? Is it “bad English”? Is it really a word? What does ain’t even stand for? Let’s break down this controversial—but very misunderstood—term. What does ain’t mean? Ain’t is a contraction that can mean am not, are not, and is not. It can also mean have not, has not, do not, does not, or did not. We ain’t joking: …

  6. 3 Types Of Collective Nouns: People, Animals, And Things

    What is a collective noun? A collective noun refers to a type of noun that encompasses “a whole group as a single entity” as well as the members of that group. It is considered singular in form. For example, words like faculty, herd, and team are collective nouns—they’re singular words but represent a group. Collective nouns differ from mass nouns (water, electricity, happiness, referring to an indefinitely …

  7. Fathers Day vs. Father’s Day: Origin And Grammar

    While Mother’s Day became an official holiday in 1914, Father’s Day took a little longer to be considered a national holiday. And its origin, sadly, lies in two, unrelated tragic events. How did Father’s Day begin? About six months after the Monongah mining disaster of 1907, in which the small West Virginia town lost over 350 men, Grace Golden Clayton organized an event to honor the …

  8. Does “None” Take A Singular Or Plural Verb?

    One is singular, and so takes a singular verb, e.g., There is only one slice of pizza left or One is wise to share. So, none should be singular, too? Not so fast. None can take a singular or plural verb. Why?! First, what is none?  At its most basic level, none means “not one (of something).” It comes from Old English n?n, which is equivalent …

  9. Affixes Explained: Prefixes, Suffixes, And Combining Forms

    In English, we love to make new words by adding all sorts of bits to the front and back of existing terms. These are called affixes, and they are added to the base or stem of a word. What is an affix? An affix is officially defined as “a bound inflectional or derivational element, as a prefix, infix, or suffix, added to a base or …

  10. Why Do We Capitalize The Pronoun “I”?

    Even though it feels natural to English speakers, capitalizing I is unusual. In fact, English is the only language that does it. Germanic and Romantic languages typically have some conventions for capitalizing proper nouns, like Deutschland (in German) or Place de la Concorde (in French), but English is the only one that insists on capitalizing the personal pronoun. Still don’t think it’s weird … then …