Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR YOUTHS

The two youths jumped with all their strength to reach the departing galley.

One of these youths, fancying himself a mimic, had imitated the Moslems.

The youths, gripping tightly their rifles and muskets, waited.

Homer pictures the youths and the maidens pressing the vines together.

Most of them were Shopton youths, but some, evidently, were strangers in town.

I turned to Menexenus, and said: Son of Demophon, which of you two youths is the elder?

Let us then, regardless of what may be said of us, make the education of the youths our own education.

But why, instead of consulting us, do you not consult our friend Socrates about the education of the youths?

And are you ready to give assistance in the improvement of the youths?

Before him the stars, represented as youths, plunge into the water.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English geoguð "youth," related to geong "young," from West Germanic *jugunthiz (cf. Old Saxon juguth, Old Frisian jogethe, Middle Dutch joghet, Dutch jeugd, Old High German jugund, German Jugend, Gothic junda "youth"), from the source of young (adj.)) + Proto-Germanic abstract noun suffix *-itho (see -th (2)).

The West-Germanic form was altered from Proto-Germanic *juwunthiz by influence of its contrast, *dugunthiz "ability" (source of Old English duguð). In Middle English, the medial -g- became a yogh, which then disappeared.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.