Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR WRITES

His pockets are full of filthy paper on which he writes from time to time.

Often they wished to go to a place, but were prevented, as Paul writes, Rom.

Also of the inner court he writes of '4 Toures, wherof the Kepe is one.'

But they know nothing of it yet—at least from the way Hester writes!

Southey is as hale as ever, and writes with his usual diligence.

Among other matters he writes this: 'I warn all brethren in England to be careful.

Arthur, whom we expect every day, writes us word that all search for him has been in vain.

"I am waking up these boys for 1872," writes the valuable phenomenon.

It's only to tell him she has changed her address—he only writes to me on Sunday nights.

He who writes for cursory reading is wise if he writes cursorily.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English writan "to score, outline, draw the figure of," later "to set down in writing" (class I strong verb; past tense wrat, past participle writen), from Proto-Germanic *writanan "tear, scratch" (cf. Old Frisian writa "to write," Old Saxon writan "to tear, scratch, write," Old Norse rita "write, scratch, outline," Old High German rizan "to write, scratch, tear," German reißen "to tear, pull, tug, sketch, draw, design"), outside connections doubtful. Words for "write" in most I.E languages originally mean "carve, scratch, cut" (cf. Latin scribere, Greek grapho, Sanskrit rikh-); a few originally meant "paint" (cf. Gothic meljan, Old Church Slavonic pisati, and most of the modern Slavic cognates).

To write (something) off (1680s) originally was from accounting; figurative sense is recorded from 1889. Write-in "unlisted candidate" is recorded from 1932.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.