werewolf

[ wair-woo lf, weer-, wur- ]SEE DEFINITION OF werewolf
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR WEREWOLF

I dreamed I was the werewolf—do not shudder, dear love, for 't was only a dream.

But how passing well doth he time his absence from the haunts of the werewolf.

But suddenly a mighty tumult arose, and there were cries of "The werewolf!"

Werewolf and vampire knew, and the ebon-bodied demons that prowl by night.

Throckmorton, a werewolf who would defile her if she entered into any compact with him.

It was, as I believe, none other than the werewolf that I saw.

Sometimes the werewolf transformation led to unlucky accidents.

Sometimes a werewolf was cured merely by recognizing him while in his brute shape.

In one of Dasent's tales the water-maiden is replaced by a kind of werewolf.

If you could get hold of a werewolf's sack and burn it, a permanent cure was effected.

WORD ORIGIN

late Old English werewulf "person with the power to turn into a wolf," from wer "man" (see virile) + wulf (see wolf (n.); also see here for a short discussion of the mythology). Cf. Middle Dutch weerwolf, Old High German werwolf, Swedish varulf. In the ancient Persian calendar, the eighth month (October-November) was Varkazana-, literally "(Month of the) Wolf-Men."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR WEREWOLF

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.