tenet

[ ten-it; British also tee-nit ]SEE DEFINITION OF tenet
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TENET

He was as unconscious, almost, as he had been back there in Tenet's cabin after his fall.

Was it something in a cast of character or a tenet of a creed, or was it what any one could emulate?

The tenet of predestination was the keystone of his religion.

This tenet of his religion he infused in some measure into all his novels.

You will be surprised to know that many an Islamic tenet is entirely in accord with it.

But the new academy dogmatized in their scepticism, and held it as their tenet.

The Major adhered rigorously to every tenet of the old school.

That no tenet should be believed to be of faith, unless the New Testament contains it.

Oh, no, sir, this is a tenet held by the wisest and most admirable of men.

This was a certitude, the very faith of the Storks, a tenet which never was questioned.

WORD ORIGIN

"principle," properly "a thing held (to be true)," early 15c., from Latin tenet "he holds," third person singular present indicative of tenere "to hold, to keep, to maintain" from PIE root *ten- "to stretch" (cf. Sanskrit tantram "loom," tanoti "stretches, lasts;" Persian tar "string;" Lithuanian tankus "compact," i.e. "tightened;" Greek teinein "to stretch," tasis "a stretching, tension," tenos "sinew," tetanos "stiff, rigid," tonos "string," hence "sound, pitch;" Latin tendere "to stretch," tenuis "thin, rare, fine;" Old Church Slavonic tento "cord;" Old English thynne "thin"). Connection notion between "stretch" and "hold" is "to cause to maintain." The modern sense is probably because tenet was used in Medieval Latin to introduce a statement of doctrine.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR TENET

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.