credo

[ kree-doh, krey- ]SEE DEFINITION OF credo

Synonyms for credo

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CREDO

Christians we are,” said Pharaoh, “and will say our Paternoster and Credo with any man.

But what will you do if it become necessary to teach him his credo?

The only thing of which they are sure is that they are sure of nothing and their credo is 'I do not believe.'

Credo, he will tell you, is ‘I believe’; it is to have faith in God and in the word of God.

They listened to the Gospel and the Credo, and watched the movements of the priest.

The grand workings of the orchestra in the "Credo" in this Act could not be surpassed.

I must be excused for quoting my own words, because they are my credo.

Then he went off singing his Credo, and slunk behind a hawthorn.

It is his 'credo' against their 'ignoro'; it is, his 'expecto' against their 'non video'.

He must have little music in his soul who is deaf to such a Credo.

WORD ORIGIN

late 12c., from Latin, literally "I believe," first word of the Apostles' and Nicene Creeds, first person singular present indicative of credere "to believe," perhaps from PIE compound *kerd-dhe- "to believe," literally "to put one's heart" (cf. Old Irish cretim, Irish creidim, Welsh credu "I believe," Sanskrit śrad-dhā- "faith"). The nativized form is creed. General sense of "formula or statement of belief" is from 1580s.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CREDO

belief

nounsomething regarded as true
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.