Synonyms for starved

MOST RELEVANT

Antonyms for starved

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR STARVED

My arms have starved for you so—do you think they're going to loosen now?

"Poor chap's only starved to death," said Mrs. Gwilt-Athelstan.

I'd been whipped, an' starved, an' I was always prayin', 'Oh!

The hunger for the manhunt is like the hunger for food, and Bill Dozier had been starved for many a day.

"You're as thin as a starved—wolf," she said, and closed her eyes and shuddered.

You are going to pay me for the five years I have starved making money for you—that, too!

They'd rather have starved their summer church in the Adirondacks than nursed it with my help!

Then I asked to earn my bread; but without you I might have starved.

He first starved, and then tricked me; and if I could I'd kill him.'

But for him, I should have starved in that long illness I had, when the office would have me no longer.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English steorfan "to die" (past tense stearf, past participle storfen), from Proto-Germanic *sterban "be stiff" (cf. Old Frisian sterva, Dutch sterven, Old High German sterban "to die," Old Norse stjarfi "tetanus"), from PIE root *ster- "stiff, rigid" (cf. Greek sterphnios "stiff, rigid," sterphos "hide, skin," Old Church Slavonic strublu "strong, hard;" see stare).

The conjugation became weak in English by 16c. The sense narrowed to "die of cold" (14c.); meaning "to kill with hunger" is first recorded 1520s (earlier to starve of hunger, early 12c.). Intransitive sense of "to die of hunger" dates from 1570s. German cognate sterben retains the original sense of the word, but the English has come so far from its origins that starve to death (1910) is now common.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR STARVED

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.