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View definitions for solstice

solstice

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Example Sentences

The rate of change in daylight is slowest at the solstices—December in winter, June in summer—and fastest at the equinoxes, in mid-March and mid-September.

With Sunday’s proximity to the solstice, the time here between sunrise and sunset was about as short as it gets.

The solstice occurs in the predawn hours, making this the shortest day of the year.

Right around the solstice, they may appear as one overlapping body above the horizon.

My mother’s friend upheld her end of the bargain, but then there I was, a solstice changeling, revealing my true name.

The church groups make the displays, and the big solstice, I mean, Christmas, tree can be lit after all.

Next, Murillo opens a bottle of their Special Edition, which they distill every six months on the solstice.

As the winter solstice brought the start of the longest night of the year, it also seemed the darkest along West 60th Street.

So there we have it—pregnant virgins galore on this happy winter solstice celebration.

Jupiter in Taurus makes magical links to Neptune and the Sun on the Summer Solstice, Tuesday.

The estival solstice of Meton, the Athenian, corresponds with this day, in the 87th Olympiad.

The June sun was already shining at its solstice, and the time to leave for Icla's home had come.

It then turns towards the winter solstice, as far as Issus, and thence immediately makes a bend to the south to Phœnicia.

At winter solstice, the vertical rays strike 23½° S. latitude, the Tropic of Capricorn.

So, in Adelie Land, short spells of calm weather may be expected over a period of barely three months around the summer solstice.

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On this page you'll find 32 synonyms, antonyms, and words related to solstice, such as: ceiling, crest, elevation, extent, peak, and pinnacle.

From Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

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