sloth

[ slawth or especially for 2, slohth ]SEE DEFINITION OF sloth

Antonyms for sloth

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SLOTH

Moderation is the languor and sloth of the soul, Ambition its activity and heat.

Mealy-bug is usually a sign of sloth on the part of the gardener.

To her well-wishers it seemed as if the people had given itself to sloth and indulgence.

She's an old thing herself, and of course she hasn't the nerves of a sloth.

Am I the cause that he hath sunk in sloth, and men scoff at his name and his strength?'

Our heroes shivered, and wondered if any sin in the calendar were equal to that of sloth!

For this he had kept his body clean and his soul clean where all about him was sloth and slackness.

There are five varieties of monkeys in the tropical forests, as well as a sloth.

The sloth, which has four feet, is unable to use them to support his body on the earth.

Seldom, unless perhaps by accident, is a sloth seen upon the ground.

WORD ORIGIN

late 12c., "indolence, sluggishness," formed from Middle English slou, slowe (see slow (adj.)) + abstract formative -th (2). Replaced Old English slæwð "sloth, indolence." Sense of "slowness, tardiness" is from mid-14c. As one of the deadly sins, it translates Latin accidia.

The slow-moving mammal first so called 1610s, a translation of Portuguese preguiça "slowness, slothfulness," from Latin pigritia "laziness" (cf. Spanish perezosa "slothful," also "the sloth").

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SLOTH

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.