shambles

[ sham-buh l ]SEE DEFINITION OF shambles
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SHAMBLES

He staggered back to his room like a bullock to its pen after it has had its death-blow in the shambles.

The place was become a shambles, and the very kennels ran with blood.

And the shambles he had seen there couldn't have been done by human beings.

When asked what it was like in there Mr. Nicholas B. muttered the only word "Shambles."

When asked what it was like in there, Mr. Nicholas B. muttered only the word "Shambles."

The shambles was not yet over, but the four could remain no longer.

The cock-pit of the "Drake" was like a butcher's shambles, so bespattered was it with blood.

They put a rope round him, and drag him, groaning, into the shambles behind.

They reminded him of the beeves in the shambles of the elder Varro.

He turned it into a blacksmith shop; you turned it into a shambles.

WORD ORIGIN

early 15c., "meat or fish market," from schamil "table, stall for vending" (c.1300), from Old English scamol, scomul "stool, footstool (also figurative); bench, table for vending," an early West Germanic borrowing (cf. Old Saxon skamel "stool," Middle Dutch schamel, Old High German scamel, German schemel, Danish skammel "footstool") from Latin scamillus "low stool, a little bench," ultimately a diminutive of scamnum "stool, bench," from PIE root *skabh- "to prop up, support." In English, sense evolved from "place where meat is sold" to "slaughterhouse" (1540s), then figuratively "place of butchery" (1590s), and generally "confusion, mess" (1901, usually in plural).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SHAMBLES

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.