Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SCOTCHED

And, as you said, I shall only have myself to blame if the story's not scotched here and now.

One reason of this was that party feeling in politics had been scotched.

But the male in him was scotched by the knowledge that she was not under his spell nor his influence.

The cellar ran full with its tally of scotched and crippled men.

There wall be anarchy in this land if these rattlesnakes are not scotched—you can't kill them.

It is to Loring's sole credit that the indiscretion was scotched.

He knew that superstition was scotched, but he also knew it was far from slain.

The serpent is scotched, not slain; and we must beware of its fangs.

So that after all,” said the old man, “it was only scotched, not killed.

At the end of 1864, the Confederacy was scotched if not quite killed.

WORD ORIGIN

"of Scotland," 1590s, contraction of Scottish. Disdained by the Scottish because of the many insulting and pejorative formations made from it by the English (e.g. Scotch greys "lice;" Scotch attorney, a Jamaica term from 1864 for strangler vines).

Scotch-Irish is from 1744 (adj.); 1789 (n.); more properly Scots-Irish (1966), from Scots (mid-14c.), the older adjective, which is from Scottis, the northern variant of Scottish. Scots (adj.) was used in Scottish until 18c., then Scotch became vernacular, but in mid-19c. there was a reaction against it. Scotch Tape was said to be so called because at first it had adhesive only on the edges (to make it easier to remove as a masking tape in car paint jobs), which was interpreted as a sign of cheapness on the part of the manufacturers.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.