Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PATRONS

Female performers are frequently expected to drink with the patrons.

He had shown more interest than other patrons in pressing Casanova's suit.

Fade at the Persian's foot, You that, our patrons were pledged, should never adorn a slave!

Let us first approach the river-gods, or patrons of the flux.

The patrons lined up, keeping their faces toward the bandit.

They want to please and to excel, and to number you among their patrons for the future.

What if I burst through this slavery of patrons and chairmen and boards?

He had bought Long's first picture in the Salon and had procured him patrons.

I refer to the rights of the Committee, or the Trustees, or Patrons, in the control of the school.

The teacher is the agent; the patrons, represented in these several ways, are the principals.

WORD ORIGIN

"a lord-master, a protector," c.1300, from Old French patron "patron, protector, patron saint" (12c.) and directly from Medieval Latin patronus "patron saint, bestower of a benefice, lord, master, model, pattern," from Latin patronus "defender, protector, former master (of a freed slave); advocate," from pater (genitive patris) "father" (see father (n.)). Meaning "one who advances the cause" (of an artist, institution, etc.), usually by the person's wealth and power, is attested from late 14c.; "commonly a wretch who supports with insolence, and is paid with flattery" [Johnson]. Commercial sense of "regular customer" first recorded c.1600. Patron saint (1717) originally was simply patron (late 14c.).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PATRONS

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.