synonyms
  • definitions

overlooks

[ verb oh-ver-look; noun oh-ver-look ]SEE DEFINITION OF overlooks

Synonyms for overlooks

  • discount
  • forget
  • ignore
  • omit
  • disdain
  • miss
  • overpass
  • pass
  • slight
  • fail to notice
  • leave out
  • leave undone
  • let fall between the cracks
  • let go
  • let slide
  • make light of
  • pass by
  • pay no attention
  • slip up
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Antonyms for overlooks

  • pay attention
  • recognize
  • remember
  • get
  • praise
  • attend
  • deny
  • follow
  • heed
  • honor
  • look at
  • notice
  • prevent
  • refuse
  • regard
  • respect
  • serve
  • veto
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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR OVERLOOKS

There is a wonderful building there called the Alhambra; it overlooks my house.

And that room, too, overlooks a tiny courtyard where one can neither see nor breathe.

But the chief beauty of these two courts is a small window which overlooks them.

Many sorrows which he overlooks the deaconess can discern and assuage.

“‘The Devil overlooks Lincoln,’ they say,” remarked Margaret, laughingly.

Then it turned toward Otrabanda along the cliff that overlooks the sea.

A great camp was formed on the down which overlooks Portsmouth.

I have a basket of grapes for you in the book-room that overlooks our garden.

It not only discounts the objects of their unity but overlooks the truth of its origins.

It is located on the western slope of a hill and overlooks the lake.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-14c., "to examine, scrutinize, inspect," from over- + look (v.). Another Middle English sense was "to peer over the top of." These two literal senses have given rise to the two main modern meanings. Meaning "to look over or beyond and thus not see," via notion of "to choose to not notice" is first recorded 1520s. Seemingly contradictory sense of "to watch over officially, keep an eye on, superintend" is from 1530s. Related: Overlooked; overlooking. In Shekaspeare's day, overlooking also was a common term for "inflicting the evil eye on" (someone or something).