orifice

[ awr-uh-fis, or- ]SEE DEFINITION OF orifice

Synonyms for orifice

MOST RELEVANT

Antonyms for orifice

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ORIFICE

One may take a sheep's bladder into the orifice of which a tube is fastened.

There had been only a superficial examination by Tomlinson of the orifice of the wound.

A jet of soapsuds plays on each drill from an orifice 1/32 in.

It was not difficult then to stop up the orifice with a little fat.

He examined the edge of the orifice where the rock rested upon it.

Many of the travelers did not even move as they left the orifice.

He soon picked out the orifice of Marie Antoinette's chimney.

The bees enlarged the orifice and dragged out the now dead queens.

And when the incision was made, he observed, 'The orifice is not large enough.'

It decreases a little as the size of the orifice is greater.

WORD ORIGIN

early 15c., from Middle French orifice "the opening of a wound" (14c.) and directly from Latin orificium "an opening," literally "mouth-making," from os (genitive oris) "mouth" (see oral) + facere "make" (see factitious). Related: Orificial.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ORIFICE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.