obliterates

[ uh-blit-uh-reyt ]SEE DEFINITION OF obliterates
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR OBLITERATES

The latter is thick and black and obliterates familiar landmarks.

The snow is a great telltale, and blabs as effectually as it obliterates.

Like the doctrine of leaf-metamorphosis it obliterates distinctions.

And even the scars where ugliness was time whitens and obliterates.

The snow is a great tell-tale, and blabs as effectually as it obliterates.

The numeral 200 generally takes the place of 100 and obliterates it.

The snow, whirling along with the wind, obliterates everything.

The English version is correct as regards the sense, though it obliterates the beautiful metaphor by its rendering "trusteth."

The manner is entirely subordinated to the matter; the poet, if there was a poet in the case, obliterates himself.

Still, I cling to the consoling thought of my matchless lungs, and this obliterates my present sufferings.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1600, from Latin obliteratus, past participle of obliterare "cause to disappear, blot out, erase, efface," figuratively "cause to be forgotten," from ob "against" (see ob-) + littera (also litera) "letter, script" (see letter (n.)); abstracted from phrase literas scribere "write across letters, strike out letters." Related: Obliterated; obliterating.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.