Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MORE BRILLIANT

No more brilliant spectacle than this masked ball could be imagined.

They are feeding, and they are growing stronger and more brilliant.

She bestowed it, however, upon an older man and a more brilliant than any of us.

Meanwhile there had been, on the part of my pupils, no more brilliant, more exemplary morning.

Nothing could have been more brilliant, or flattering, or more cordial than his offer.

The history of the world contains no more brilliant and heroic picture.

We come back to it with relief from more brilliant qualities.

Albuquerque's next exploit was yet more brilliant and yet more important.

The show-case on the ground-floor is more brilliant than usual.

May I venture to suggest to your Excellency that your riposte is more brilliant than safe?

WORD ORIGIN

1680s, from French brilliant "sparkling, shining" present participle of briller "to shine" (16c.), from Italian brillare "sparkle, whirl," perhaps from Vulgar Latin *berillare "to shine like a beryl," from berillus "beryl, precious stone," from Latin beryllus (see beryl). In reference to diamonds (1680s) it means a flat-topped cut invented 17c. by Venetian cutter Vincenzo Peruzzi.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.