morbid

[ mawr-bid ]SEE DEFINITION OF morbid

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MORBID

Philip himself, too, was morbid in his excessive tenderness for this boy.

This was no morbid sentimentalist; no pining, heart-broken woman.

You may say that Robespierre was morbid and unbalanced, and you may say the same of Bunyan.

The official brains of the nation are in a morbid condition.

I shrunk with morbid nervousness from owning to any knowledge of Eugen.

Neither of them had natural tact, and Godwin's sensibility was morbid.

From a just view of his responsibilities he had gone on to a morbid one.

The idea, morbid as it might be, brought him solace this time.

"Surely that must be a morbid fancy," Greta said in a distressed tone.

To Charles, no doubt, this seemed a morbid notion to be discouraged.

WORD ORIGIN

1650s, "of the nature of a disease, indicative of a disease," from Latin morbidus "diseased," from morbus "sickness, disease, ailment, illness," from root of mori "to die," which is possibly from PIE root *mer- "to rub, pound, wear away" (cf. Sanskrit mrnati "crushes, bruises;" Greek marainein "to consume, exhaust, put out, quench," marasmus "consumption"). Transferred use, of mental states, is from 1777. Related: Morbidly; morbidness.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MORBID

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