Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MEMBERS

The chapel was thronged, the majority of members being women.

From the first he appears to have favorably impressed the members of the House.

We have learned to be citizens of the world, members of the human community.

In the House of Lords there was also a full attendance of members.

Other relatives followed, and then most of the members of Parliament.

The usual working force of the House of Lords is from thirty to forty members.

Members that never attended were drummed up to vote against the bill.

The Prince of Wales and other members of the royal family were present.

He was sorry to see this tendency to aristocracy on the part of members.

The other members of O'Hara's party had crawled down the bank by that time.

WORD ORIGIN

late 13c., "sex organ" (cf. Latin membrum virile, but in English originally of women as well as men), also, "body part or organ" (in plural, "the body"), from Old French membre "part, portion; topic, subject; limb, member of the body; member" (of a group, etc.)," 11c., from Latin membrum "limb, member of the body, part," probably from PIE *mems-ro, from root *mems- "flesh, meat" (cf. Sanskrit mamsam "flesh;" Greek meninx "membrane," meros "thigh" (the "fleshy part"); Gothic mimz "flesh"). In English, sense of "person belonging to a group" is first attested early 14c., from notion of "constituent part of a complex structure." Meaning "one who has been elected to parliament" is from early 15c.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MEMBERS

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.