Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR HAPPIEST

The happiest of us has been weary of her many a time and oft.

So he lived and so he died, the most revered and the happiest man in all his native shire.

This is the happiest period of my life, and has been so since I left the hospital at Batavia.

Dear Mr Clennam, make me of all the world the happiest, by saying Yes?

This day is the happiest I have seen since I left the land of cakes.

If a mother's prayers could avail, you would be the happiest of human beings.

Lady Leonora is now the happiest of wives, and your Grace the happiest of mothers.

The evenings we spent there are amongst the happiest hours in my memory.

But I restore the same man to the best and happiest part of his life.

If I can only get what I want I'll be the happiest fellow alive!

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., "lucky, favored by fortune, prosperous;" of events, "turning out well," from hap (n.) "chance, fortune" + -y (2). Sense of "very glad" first recorded late 14c. Ousted Old English eadig (from ead "wealth, riches") and gesælig, which has become silly. Meaning "greatly pleased and content" is from 1520s. Old English bliðe "happy" survives as blithe. From Greek to Irish, a great majority of the European words for "happy" at first meant "lucky." An exception is Welsh, where the word used first meant "wise."

Used in World War II and after as a suffix (e.g. bomb-happy, flak-happy) expressing "dazed or frazzled from stress." Happy medium is from 1778. Happy ending in the literary sense recorded from 1756. Happy as a clam (1630s) was originally happy as a clam in the mud at high tide, when it can't be dug up and eaten. Happy hunting ground, the reputed Indian paradise, is attested from 1840, American English. Related: Happier; happiest.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.