folklore

[ fohk-lawr, -lohr ]SEE DEFINITION OF folklore

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FOLKLORE

In this same connection may be named other items of folklore related by Mr. Dyer.

Some of them are even comic characters, like the devil in Scottish folklore.

This cruder belief is more familiar in the folklore of Europe than the other.

In Folklore, however, the word is used in a different and wider sense.

The barghest has a kinsman in the Rongeur d'Os of Norman folklore.

The traditions, mythologies, and folklore of all the past have thus arisen.

Many of the Pennsylvania Dutch foods are a part of their folklore.

It is made up of two elements, an element of folklore and an element of satire.

This is more particularly needed in the department of folklore.

This contact is a fact equally important to history and to folklore.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR FOLKLORE

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