Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FABLE

The fable is fanciful and pleasing in itself; but will it not hereafter be believed as reality?

Were not youth and age merely a fable; visions of men's fancy?

There was silence, and before I had finished my fable the little bell rang.

I commenced, and the sweetness of my voice in the fable of the "Two Pigeons" worked the miracle.

Arthur was a Celt, and may have been a fabulous Celt; but he was a fable on the right side.

Let us change the subject; let us have a romance or a fable or a fairy tale.

The fable of the labours of Hercules is the type of all human doing and success.

He tried to console her, bent over her, whispered to her—some say kissed her, but that's a fable.

Perhaps the fate of Niobe is no fable, but a type of the callousness of our nature.

They teach us that thy power is a fable, and that thy divinity is a dream.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, "falsehood, lie, pretense," from Old French fable (12c.) "story, fable, tale; fiction, lie, falsehood," from Latin fabula "story, play, fable, narrative, account, tale," literally "that which is told," related to fari "speak, tell," from PIE root *bha- (2) "speak" (see fame (n.)). Sense of "animal story" (early 14c.) comes from Aesop. In modern folklore terms, defined as "a short, comic tale making a moral point about human nature, usually through animal characters behaving in human ways." Most trace to Greece or India.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR FABLE

fairy tale

nounchildren's imaginative story with magical characters
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.