Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FIDDLE

Why, inside two weeks he'll be fit as a fiddle, and inside a month he'll be his own self!

For he had been painfully conscious now and then that he played but second fiddle.

So the lad seated himself, and placed his fiddle in position.

"I have only my fiddle in the world, and I cannot give that away," he said sadly, after thinking a while.

I know how to play 'Little lambkins, come down,' if I only had a fiddle.

And the teacher opened the door, and took his fiddle from its place on the wall.

The grandmother was really standing there, holding the fiddle out to him.

Rico cast one look at the fiddle, and departed with deep sadness in his heart.

Rico placed himself at a little distance, and began to play on his fiddle.

"A fiddle's great value," John's neighbour whispered to him.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., fedele, earlier fithele, from Old English fiðele, which is related to Old Norse fiðla, Middle Dutch vedele, Dutch vedel, Old High German fidula, German Fiedel; all of uncertain origin.

Perhaps from Medieval Latin vitula "stringed instrument," which is perhaps related to Latin vitularia "celebrate joyfully," from Vitula, Roman goddess of joy and victory, who probably, like her name, originated among the Sabines [Klein, Barnhart]. Unless the Medieval Latin word is from the Germanic ones.

Fiddle has been relegated to colloquial usage by its more proper cousin, violin, a process encouraged by phraseology such as fiddlesticks, contemptuous nonsense word fiddlededee (1784), and fiddle-faddle. Fit as a fiddle is from 1610s.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR FIDDLE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.