Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FALLS

We rolled on, and entered the village of Manchester, bordering on the falls.

From the height of pride and confidence he falls to utter hopelessness.

"She'll quit if she falls dead," replied the other man, quietly.

Methinks she will fade into the moonlight, which falls upon her through the window.

Some were for encamping here for the night; others favored going on to the Falls.

Fallings, are when the Body, being out of its proper Poise, falls by its own Weight.

He falls at Ravenswood, in the battle against the Swedish king, Ongenþew, 2925.

That one falls in love with her goes without saying, but that is not enough.

The Ridiculous only, as I have before said, falls within my province in the present work.

How was it that my friend loved the Falls, and what had he understood of their marvellous grandeur?

WORD ORIGIN

Old English feallan (class VII strong verb; past tense feoll, past participle feallen) "to fall; fail, decay, die," from Proto-Germanic *fallanan (cf. Old Frisian falla, Old Saxon fallan, Dutch vallen, Old Norse falla, Old High German fallan, German fallen), from PIE root *pol- "to fall" (cf. Armenian p'ul "downfall," Lithuanian puola "to fall," Old Prussian aupallai "finds," literally "falls upon").

Most of the figurative senses had developed in Middle English. Meaning "to be reduced" (as temperature) is from 1650s. To fall in love is attested from 1520s; to fall asleep is late 14c. Fall through "come to naught" is from 1781. To fall for something is from 1903.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR FALLS

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.