deport

[ dih-pawrt, -pohrt ]SEE DEFINITION OF deport
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DEPORT

By Jove, I wish we could fix something on that man and get the government to deport him.

Through all the trying hours of that ordeal how like a hero did he deport himself!

The government looked into the matter and decided to deport them.

Exactly as before she appeared, so he continued to deport himself.

That is, it is for you to say how you will deport yourself on matters of religion.

There was insufficient evidence to jail him, but enough to deport him.

They are unable either to make use of it or to deport it to Germany.

I tells him how he should deport hisself after he's done so.

If you were on Mars, lady, we'd deport you so fast your tail would burn.

Yes, Sir, people who will not only consent, but beg you to deport them.

WORD ORIGIN

late 15c., "to behave," from Old French deporter "behave" (12c.), from de- "thoroughly, formally" + porter "to carry, bear oneself" (see port (n.3)). Original sense preserved in deportment.

Meaning "banish" is first recorded 1640s, from Modern French déporter, from Latin deportare "carry off, transport, banish, exile," from de- in its sense of "off, away" + portare "to carry" (but associated by folk etymology with portus "harbor"). "The two branches are treated by Darmesteter as historically distinct words in French" [OED]. Related: Deported; deporting.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR DEPORT

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.