damning

[ dam-ing, dam-ning ]SEE DEFINITION OF damning

Synonyms for damning

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DAMNING

Our eyes are shut to the damning facts which confront us on every side.

If he could only meet with Roma for a moment and thrust the damning document in her face!

The significance of it all gripped him with damning clarity.

The most damning argument against the Germans is that they were not lazy enough.

He looked again at the damning evidence and his defiance broke.

He pronounced that like a final and damning judgment of both of them.

Why had this damning evidence been allowed to sink into oblivion?

How shall I stand against his just anger, and his damning allegations!

A hundred damning fingers pointed at the solitary figure there.

He sprang to his feet, crushing the damning sheet in his hand.

WORD ORIGIN

late 13c., "to condemn," from Old French damner "damn, condemn; convict, blame; injure," derivative of Latin damnare "to adjudge guilty; to doom; to condemn, blame, reject," from noun damnum "damage, hurt, harm; loss, injury; a fine, penalty," possibly from an ancient religious term from PIE *dap- "to apportion in exchange" [see Watkins]. The Latin word evolved a legal meaning of "pronounce judgment upon." Theological sense is first recorded early 14c.; the optative expletive use likely is as old.

Damn and its derivatives generally were avoided in print from 18c. to c.1930s (the famous line in the film version of "Gone with the Wind" was a breakthrough and required much effort by the studio). The noun is recorded from 1610s; to be not worth a damn is from 1817. The adjective is 1775, short for damned; Damn Yankee, characteristic Southern U.S. term for "Northerner," is attested from 1812. Related: Damning.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR DAMNING

curse

nounhateful, swearing remark
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.