Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CURTAIN

As she spoke, Geta lifted the curtain, and Philothea instantly obeyed the signal.

The bell had rung—the curtain was up and the performances were about to begin.

Just then the curtain rose again, and the play of the "Serious Family," commenced.

At length the curtain fell, and the evening's performance was over.

Curtain rises on second act, showing the Hotel Fonseca, at Paris.

Then the curtain fell again, and this time it remained down.

When, at that instant, he saw the curtain of the alcove slightly stirred.

But fortunately there was still time to jerk down the curtain.

Then he lifted the blanket, stepped into the dark, and let the curtain fall behind him.

And now the curtain went up,—though not on the play, let me tell you!

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, from Old French cortine "curtain, tapestry, drape, blanket," from Late Latin cortina "curtain," but in classical Latin "round vessel, cauldron," from Latin cortem (older cohortem) "enclosure, courtyard" (see cohort). The confusion apparently begins in using cortina as a loan-translation for Greek aulaia ("curtain") in the Vulgate (to render Hebrew yeriah in Exodus xxvi:1, etc.) because the Greek word was connected to aule "court," perhaps because the "door" of a Greek house that led out to the courtyard was a hung cloth. The figurative sense in curtain call is from 1884. Curtains "the end" is 1912, originally from stage plays.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CURTAIN

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.