crescendo

[ kri-shen-doh, -sen-doh; Italian kre-shen-daw ]SEE DEFINITION OF crescendo
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CRESCENDO

The crescendo of motors as he ran, sobbing now in fear, for the cover of the jungle.

Then his ears caught a crescendo of the whispering that he had heard before.

Her voice had a crescendo of vehemence up to this last name.

But that crescendo is well done; yes, that is most effective.

He felt the forces within him reach a crescendo at that moment.

The journals kept up their crescendo of inquiry and information.

Tim's laugh was allegro and crescendo at the first, and staccato at the close.

Farrow could only repeat each word in a crescendo of amazement.

The crescendo pedal, as it is called, is little used in England.

The rest of his sentence was lost in a crescendo bellow of sound.

WORD ORIGIN

1776 as a musical term, from Italian crescendo "increasing," from Latin crescendo, ablative of gerund of crescere "to increase" (see crescent). Figurative use is from 1785. As a verb, from 1900.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CRESCENDO

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.