contemplative

[ kuhn-tem-pluh-tiv, kon-tuhm-pley-, -tem- ]SEE DEFINITION OF contemplative
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CONTEMPLATIVE

Plato perceived that the contemplative maiden was busy with memories of the past.

You, Caroline, are of a more sedate, contemplative character.

The whole suggestion is of a character self-absorbed and contemplative.

He sat in contemplative silence a little while, his voice low when he spoke.

The brother's contemplative smile seemed a comment upon this tone.

This was the poetic, the philosophic, the contemplative side.

Consequently the active life does not seem to precede the contemplative.

Whence it would seem that the contemplative life is not pleasurable.

Is this division of Life into the Active and the Contemplative a sufficient one?

Hence the moral virtues do not pertain to the contemplative life.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-14c., from Old French contemplatif (12c.), from Latin contemplativus, from contemplat-, past participle stem of contemplari (see contemplation).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CONTEMPLATIVE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.