constable

[ kon-stuh-buh l or, esp. British, kuhn- ]SEE DEFINITION OF constable
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CONSTABLE

Still he reflected that he would be unable to get out, and in the morning he could go for the constable.

"Six pounds if he was a gentleman: two pounds if he wasnt," said the constable.

Now, constable, do you want to hitch the other end of that arrangement on my wrist?

"The jail of the county is at Welland, the county town," replied the constable.

The constable did not know whether he was shamming or not, but he took no risks.

The constable, who knew both the farmer and his wife, nodded familiarly to them.

"I wish I was a constable for twenty-four hours," cried Mrs. Bartlett.

The constable seemed disturbed by the sight of Renmark, but he was there to do his duty.

The death of the constable had made him miserable at heart, but the failure of the plot also.

Mr. Dunbar, the constable, and Mr. Balderby drove straight to the magistrate's house.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1200, "chief household officer, justice of the peace," from Old French conestable (12c., Modern French connétable), "steward, governor," principal officer of the Frankish king's household, from Late Latin comes stabuli, literally "count of the stable" (established by Theodosian Code, c.438 C.E.), hence, "chief groom." See count (n.). Second element is from Latin stabulum "stable, standing place" (see stable (n.)). Probably a translation of a Germanic word. Meaning "an officer of the peace" is from c.1600, transferred to "police officer" 1836. French reborrowed constable 19c. as "English police."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CONSTABLE

bailiff

nounoverseer
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.