beneficent

[ buh-nef-uh-suh nt ]SEE DEFINITION OF beneficent

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BENEFICENT

It is the law of the land—the just, holy, beneficent law, which is no respecter of persons.

Let the latter do it for him, and, if need be, return to the "beneficent whip."

The beneficent source had begun to flow once more, as if it were inexhaustible.

It was a beneficent monarch, but it brooked no denial of its overlordship.

Why, then, does any dishonour attach to a beneficent occupation?

To such, the prison should act as a kind, beneficent guardian.

It was Mr. Worthington who carried out most of these beneficent works.

To all outward seeming she led a most blameless and beneficent life.

Then slumber brought its beneficent opiate to distracted nerves.

The truth of the matter was they were already tired of their beneficent project.

WORD ORIGIN

1610s, "doing good, charitable," probably from beneficent on model of magnificent, etc.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BENEFICENT

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