émigré

[ em-i-grey; French ey-mee-grey ]SEE DEFINITION OF émigré
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ÉMIGRÉ

A future king of France, while an emigre, had been to Louisiana.

I thought I was saving an emigre, but I love you better as a Republican.

The old captain was an emigre, and had returned undecided what he would do.

You do not understand how delicate the position of an emigre is towards those who are now in possession of his property.

Were you aware that sometime in the fall of 1963, that a lady was residing with Mrs. Paine who was a Russian emigre?

And was that a social circle of Russian emigre, a certain set of Russian emigre?

That's correct, because being of the same nationality, I thought he was hurting all of our emigre here in Dallas.

Now, among the Russian emigre group in Dallas, did you ever know of anybody that you even thought might be a Communist?

I had my suspicions, having just come from an emigre party where the Marquise was hating and praising him as usual.

It's neither here nor there, of course, but those French emigre parties they almost make you cry.

WORD ORIGIN

1792, from French émigré "an emigrant," noun use of past participle of émigrer "emigrate" (18c.), from Latin emigrare (see emigration). Originally used of royalist refugees from the French Revolution; extended 1920s to refugees from the Russian Revolution, then generally to political exiles.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ÉMIGRÉ

emigrant

nounperson who leaves his or her native country
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.