pilgrim

[ pil-grim, -gruh m ]SEE DEFINITION OF pilgrim

Synonyms for pilgrim

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EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PILGRIM

Never did a pilgrim approach Niagara with deeper enthusiasm than mine.

I suppose the Pilgrim and the Rake are contrasted with each other.

Why was Mr. Greatheart, in Pilgrim's Progress, my favorite character?

I only said that you are a pilgrim, a nobleman, and that I used to know you.

In 'The Pilgrim's Progress' we are among genuine human beings.

Christiana and her children are tolerated for the pilgrim's sake to whom they belong.

The Pilgrim himself was beyond the reach of such uneasy visions.

Thus the 'Pilgrim's Progress' is a book, which, when once read, can never be forgotten.

Like his own Pilgrim, he had the burden on his back of his conscious unworthiness.

He wonders if Nannie ever went to school, and if she has read the Pilgrim's Progress?

WORD ORIGIN

c.1200, pilegrim, from Old French pelerin, peregrin "pilgrim, crusader; foreigner, stranger" (11c., Modern French pèlerin), from Late Latin pelegrinus, dissimilated from Latin peregrinus "foreigner" (source of Italian pellegrino, Spanish peregrino), from peregre (adv.) "from abroad," from per- "beyond" + agri, locative case of ager "country" (see acre).

Change of first -r- to -l- in most Romance languages by dissimilation; the -m appears to be a Germanic modification. Pilgrim Fathers "English Puritans who founded Plymouth colony" is first found 1799 (they called themselves Pilgrims from c.1630, in reference to Hebrew xi:13).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PILGRIM

colonial

adjectivepioneering, relating to a nonindependent or new territory
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.