withstands

[ with-stand, with- ]SEE DEFINITION OF withstands
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR WITHSTANDS

It withstands, however, the frosts of winter better than most other grasses.

It also withstands the frosts remarkably, being a hardy plant.

It is very elastic and withstands the climate, when seasoned, as well as Teak.

But men have a saying, My only delight in being lord is that no one withstands what I say.

Now if what he says is good, and no one withstands him, is not that good too?

Pitch, it is true, withstands water, but it also invites the flame.

Its great virtue is that it withstands a soil largely composed of lime.

It withstands change and time and many a coercive intimation.

The grape, as a rule, withstands drought very well, several species growing wild on the desert's edge.

The bloom is very hardy, and withstands the night frosts of spring better than most other varieties.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English wiðstandan, from wið "against" (see with) + standan "to stand" (see stand (v.)); perhaps a loan-translation of Latin resistere "to resist" (see resist). Cf. Old Norse viðstanda, Old Frisian withstonda, Old High German widarstan. In 14c. and early 15c., withsit was in use with the same meaning. Related: Withstood; withstanding.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.