Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR WILDS

But in the dimness of these two aisles lurks the spirit of the wilds.

There is a tradition that not long after this he “was lost in the wilds of the West.”

There wasn't a thing that could happen—it wasn't as though these were wilds.

Signs of human life are not altogether wanting in these wilds.

And Tresler, following her, was struck with the simple comfort of this home in the wilds.

I have lived too long in the wilds to be a pleasant companion.

In that house, in the wilds of Kerry, sheer loyalty could not be expected.

Shall I tell you how I killed his brother in the wilds of Colombia?

There was even a small dock—luxury unthinkable in these wilds.

Moreover, in the wilds at 50° below zero there is the most complete silence.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English wilde "in the natural state, uncultivated, undomesticated," from Proto-Germanic *wilthijaz (cf. Old Saxon wildi, Old Norse villr, Old Frisian wilde, Dutch wild, Old High German wildi, German wild, Gothic wilþeis "wild," German Wild (n.) "game"), probably from PIE *ghwelt- (cf. Welsh gwyllt "untamed"), related to the base of Latin ferus (see fierce).

Meaning "sexually dissolute, loose" is attested from mid-13c. U.S. slang sense of "exciting, excellent" is recorded from 1955. The noun meaning "uncultivated or desolate region" is first attested 1590s in the wilds. Baseball wild pitch is recorded from 1867. Wildest dreams first attested 1961 (in Carson McCullers). Wild West first recorded 1849. Wild Turkey brand of whiskey (Austin Nichols Co.) in use from 1942.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR WILDS

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.