Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR VICAR

Katharine, dear, are you going to the vicar's garden party this afternoon?

Mrs. Cambray put in a word of hope and fear about Vicar's Dale.

Get me the rector of the parish—a vicar, a curate, something of that sort.

The young men had their House of Commons, with their vicar as Speaker.

I succeeded him as vicar, remaining there from 1870 to 1880.

His father was vicar of St. Michael's there for twenty-seven years.

We were just going to offer our Vicar, but he has no inscription on him.

One of them was the girl of the vicar's pew, grown taller and more winsome.

Some time in the afternoon he heard the voice and step of the vicar in the room below.

Perhaps, after all, she had no business in this house—perhaps the vicar was right.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, from Old French vicaire, from Latin vicarius "substitute, deputy," noun use of adj. vicarius "substituting," from vicis "change, turn, office" (see vicarious). The original notion is of "earthly representative of God or Christ;" but also used in sense of "person acting as parish priest in place of a real parson" (early 14c.).

The original Vicar of Bray (in figurative use from 1660s) seems to have been Simon Allen, who held the benefice from c.1540 to 1588, thus serving from the time of Henry VIII to Elizabeth I, and was twice a Catholic and twice a Protestant, but always vicar of Bray. The village is near Maidenhead in Berkshire.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR VICAR

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.