ecclesiastic

[ ih-klee-zee-as-tik ]SEE DEFINITION OF ecclesiastic
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ECCLESIASTIC

Is it your intention to condemn my son to be an ecclesiastic?

He is a diplomatist, an ecclesiastic, an embodiment of all that is severe and archaic in authority.

That painted window's said to be the oldest of any, not ecclesiastic, in Europe.

My reputation then was blasted by the industry of this ecclesiastic.

By the side of this ecclesiastic, his Wolsley is, so to speak, nowhere.

Footnote 345: This ecclesiastic was much in the royal confidence.

Barclay seems to have been first an Englishman, then an ecclesiastic.

Far off, in the almost empty nave, an ecclesiastic was preaching.

Among them was a younger brother of La Salle, with an ecclesiastic called M. Cavalier, and also a nephew.

The dress of the ecclesiastic was much more imposing than that of the boatmen.

WORD ORIGIN

late 15c., from Middle French ecclésiastique and directly from Late Latin ecclesiasticus, from Greek ekklesiastikos "of the (ancient Athenian) assembly," later, "of the church," from ekklesiastes "speaker in an assembly or church, preacher," from ekkalein "to call out," from ek "out" (see ex-) + kalein "to call" (see claim (v.)).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ECCLESIASTIC

churchly

adjectivespiritual
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.