Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TRAIPSE

"Or why she consents to traipse all over the country with you," laughed Ted.

I don't mean she's got enough to traipse round with duchesses and earls and that sort, but she's got enough.

She called me up twice yesterday to see they needed it, as if I had nothin' to do but traipse aroun' after her.

And what's more, you just don't need to traipse along another step with me now.

Hard luck on me having to traipse at this time of night to a place I don't know to get orders you ought to have sent out.

Goodness knows where you may have dropped it, and if you think I'm going to traipse back you're much mistaken.

She was a young forty, yet somehow hardly young enough to traipse houseless after him wherever his whim might lead him.

Women, whose age it is impossible to tell, trail and traipse in front of alleys within which loom greasy, black staircases.

WORD ORIGIN

1590s, of uncertain origin, perhaps from dialectal French trepasser "pass over or beyond," from Old French trespasser (see trespass). Or from a source related to Middle Dutch trappen, dialectal Norwegian trappa "to tread, stamp" (see trap). Liberman points out that it resembles German traben "tramp" "and other similar verbs meaning 'tramp; wander; flee' in several European languages. They seem to have been part of soldiers' and vagabonds' slang between 1400 and 1700. In all likelihood, they originated as onomatopoeias and spread to neighboring languages from Low German." Related: Traipsed; traipsing.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR TRAIPSE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.