Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR THWARTS

To his joy he found a pair of oars stowed beneath the thwarts.

On her thwarts two figures, dipping and rising, labored with the sweeps.

The thole pins were in place, and the oars laid lengthwise on its thwarts.

Peer was gripping the line firmly with one hand, the other clutching one of the thwarts.

My men dropped the oars and fell off the thwarts as if dead.

Mr. Parasyte ordered the men to take their places on the thwarts, and ship their oars.

"The thwarts: lubbers call them the seats," replied the old seaman, laughing.

Don John thwarts the marriage of Claudio by his tale of Hero's unchastity.

The boat struck the water, and its crew were on the thwarts in a moment.

All right, my lad; plenty of tackle in the boat under the thwarts.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1200, from Old Norse þvert "across," originally neuter of thverr (adj.) "transverse, across," cognate with Old English þweorh "transverse, perverse, angry, cross," from Proto-Germanic *thwerkhaz (cf. Middle Dutch dwers, Dutch dwars "cross-grained, contrary," Old High German twerh, German quer, Gothic þwairhs "angry"), altered (by influence of *thwer- "to turn") from *therkh-, from PIE *twork-/*twerk- "twist" (cf. Latin torquere "to twist," Sanskrit tarkuh "spindle," Old Church Slavonic traku "band, girdle," Old High German drahsil "turner," German drechseln "to turn on a lathe").

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.